Speech Outline

Name

Professor/Class 

Assignment

Date

Title of Speech

INTRODUCTION

  • Opening Greeting/Introduce Self to Audience:
  • Hook/Attention Grabber:
  • Purpose (exigency):
  • Thesis:
  • Roadmap (what will the speech cover and in what order?):
  • Transition to Body: 

BODY

I. Main Point #1: 

  1. Secondary Point:
  1. Support
  2. Support
  3. Support
  4. Secondary Point:
  1. Support
  2. Support
  3. Support
  4. Secondary Point:
  1. Support
  2. Support
  3. Support

Transition: 

II. Main Point #2: 

     A. Secondary Point:

  1. Support
  2. Support
  3. Support

     B. Secondary Point:

  1. Support
  2. Support
  3. Support

     C. Secondary Point:

  1. Support
  2. Support
  3. Support

Transition: 

III. Main Point #3: 

     A. Secondary Point

  1. Support
  2. Support
  3. Support

     B. Secondary Point

  1. Support
  2. Support
  3. Support

    C. Secondary Point

  1. Support
  2. Support
  3. Support

Transition: 

CONCLUSION:

  • Summary of main points:
  • Takeaway for audience/something for people to think about after speech is over
  • Memorable closing statement

Works Cited (if needed)

Sources aligned to the left margin for the first line, with subsequent lines indented.

NOTE: The above outline is just a template. Your own speech, for example, might make different moves in the introduction and/or the conclusion. It may contain fewer main points, secondary points, and support. Alternatively, you may include additional main points, secondary points, and support. You might find it helpful to add delivery cues if you’re using a version of this template for your working speech outline. Finally, think of your speech outline as a living document, one you adjust based on practice runs and timing. Additionally, many speeches use the outline to build a transcript of the speech, filling in the various sections in complete sentences. 

Copyright, 2022, Lamanda Beesley Conrad

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